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Geoffrey Bagwell

Doctor of Philosophy
Spokane Community College
1810 North Greene Street
Spokane, Washington 99217

Mail Stop 2011

Office: 1-209B

Phone: (509) 533-7363

Email: Geoffrey.Bagwell@scc.spokane.edu

Education

Ph.D. Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 2010
M.A. Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 2008
M.A.L.A. St. John's College, Annapolis, Maryland, 2006
B.A. University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, 2003

Courses

Introduction to Philosophy (PHIL& 101)

This course introduces students to some of the most fundamental problems in philosophy through the reading and discussion of several of the most important philosophers in history such as Plato, Rene Descartes, and David Hume. Topics include reasoning, knowledge, skepticism, perception, induction, mind and body, personal identity, and free will. Five credits. No prerequisites. Satisfies Philosophy and the Humanities Distribution Requirement for the Associate of Arts Degree. Transfers to any public four-year university in Washington. Offered every quarter.

Introduction to Logic (PHIL& 106)

This course introduces students to the methods and principles of deductive reasoning. Topics include informal argumentation, fallacies, propositional and predicate logic, truth-tables, and natural deduction. Five credits. No prerequisites. Satisfies Philosophy and the Humanities and Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning Distribution Requirements for the Associate of Arts Degree. Transfers to any public four-year university in Washington. Offered every quarter.

Ethics (PHIL 210)

This course introduces students to the three central ethical theories in philosophy. Topics includes moral relativism, moral absolutism, eudaemonism, deontology, and consequentialism. Five credits. No prerequisites. Satisfies Philosophy and the Humanities Distribution Requirement for the Associate of Arts Degree. Transfers to any public four-year university in Washington. Usually offered fall quarter.

Environmental Philosophy (PHIL 215)

In this course, students explore the philosophical relationship between human beings and the non-human world. The moral status of animals and ecosystems, anthropocentrism versus biocentrism, environmental economics and public policy, deep ecology, ecofeminism, and the idea of a "land ethic" are emphasized. Five credits. No prerequisites. Satisfies Philosophy and the Humanities Distribution Requirement for the Associate of Arts Degree. Transfers to any public four-year university in Washington. Usually offered annually.

Philosophy of Religion (PHIL 220)

The course introduces students to problems in classical and contemporary philosophy of religion concentrating on the nature of religion, religious disagreements, the existence of God, the problem of evil, the relation between faith and reason, and religious language. Five credits. No prerequisites. Satisfies Philosophy and the Humanities Distribution Requirement for the Associate of Arts Degree. Transfers to any public four-year university in Washington. Usually offered winter quarter.

Modern Philosophical Problems (PHIL 231)

The course introduces students to problems in the philosophy of mind. Topics include consciousness, perception, the relationship between the mind and the body. Five credits. No prerequisites. Satisfies Philosophy and the Humanities Distribution Requirement for the Associate of Arts Degree. Transfers to any public four-year university in Washington. Usually offered spring quarter.